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munter is very familiar with the debate that went on between the state department and the cia. if you look at the drone strikes over the past four years, in 2010 there were 122 drone strikes. the numbers have been dropping since then has the highest number of drone strikes we have engaged in. as everybody in this audience i'm sure knows president obama has launched six times more drone strikes than george w. bush in his two terms in office. the numbers have dropped 40%, 25% from 2012. i think this is a very good thing. mainly because we have -- kayani, general kayani said if you keep going after the top 20 why have you done 300 drone strikes? it does not add up. i think that is a good point and if you look at the victims of the strikes, there is a debate about how many are civilians and we at the america foundation think the civilian casualty rate is very low in the single digits but certainly there is a civilian casualty problem. in pakistan we enjoy a 9% favorability rating down from 20% and the drones are part of that story. if the cost of the successful drum program is 80 million
-awaqi was killed by the c.i.a. in a drone strike in yemen. yet, if it's being interpreted, as we have heard by some of my colleagues represented here, the feinstein amendment were interpreted the way they have interpreted it, if al-awaqi made it to america to commit these terrorist acts, he gets his miranda rights, he gets all his rights here, but yet if he is in yemen committing acts to try to kill americans and our allies, then we can use a drone attack to him, but if he makes it to america -- which, by the way, the terrorists want to make it to america. 9/11 is exhibit a of that. why we would want to be in a position to read them their miranda rights, tell them you have the right to remain silent, our priority there has to be protecting american lives. that's the distinction between the law of war and a law with a common criminal in this country. and by the way, there are protections under the law. it's the right of habeas corpus where you do have a right to challenge your detention before the federal court with appeals with counsel, and that is certainly a protection that we have respected in t
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